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Showing Yonkers in NY...

Basic Information
Type of PlaceSuburb
Metro Area?NYC mainland
Politics c. 1860?Strongly Republican
Unions, Organized Labor?Don't Know

Sundown Town Status
Confirmed Sundown Town?Don't Know
Year of Greatest Interest
Was there an ordinance?Don't Know
Sign?Don't Know
Still Sundown?Surely Not

Census Information
TotalWhiteBlackAsianNativeHispanicOtherBHshld
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200019608611800732575952686150852

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Comments
"Public Housing Does Not Diminish Property Values," from National Low Income Housing Coalition: The NIMBY Report, November, 2000. Abstract: "In the midst of Baltimore's ongoing struggle to desegregate its public housing, a Harvard University scholar has raised three critical points that seem to be lost in the midst of a NIMBY charged debate about where several thousand low income African American residents will live. First, newly developed, scattered site public housing does not reduce neighbors' property values. Second, such housing does not diminish the social fabric of neighborhoods. Finally, new public housing does not compromise community safety. Drawn from the experience of Yonkers, New York, where a landmark 1986 federal court order required the city to create scattered site public housing to remedy a decades long problem of housing and school segregation, a comprehensive study conducted by Xavier de Souza Briggs, of Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government ("In the Wake of Desegregation," Journal of the American Planning Association, Winter 1999.), found that the traditional grounds for objection to public housing are not supported by fact. The study examines the impact of 200 units of low rise, townhouse style public housing built in seven neighborhoods between 1992 and 1994, and occupied primarily by very low income African Americans and Latinos. The five year study, focusing on home sales and surveys of hundreds of adjacent homeowners, concludes that there is no evidence that scattered site housing had negative impacts on receiving neighborhoods in terms of property values, neighbors%u2019 plans to move or their sense of community cohesiveness. The study also found no evidence of "white flight." The study provides strong support for advocates who want to combine the results of academic research with a coordinated program of community acceptance strategies."
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