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Showing Hamburg in SC...

Basic Information
Type of PlaceIndependent City or Town
Metro Area?Independent City or Town
Politics c. 1860?Don't Know
Unions, Organized Labor?Don't Know

Sundown Town Status
Confirmed Sundown Town?Possible
Year of Greatest Interest1876
Was there an ordinance?Don't Know
Sign?Don't Know
Still Sundown?Don't Know

Census Information
TotalWhiteBlackAsianNativeHispanicOtherBHshld
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Method of Exclusion
Violent Expulsion

Main Ethnic Group(s).
Unknown

Group(s) Excluded
Black

Comments
Opposite Augusta on the Savannah river, Hamburg was founded in the 1830s as a railroad terminus. It eventually became virtually all black before being subsumed by the town of North Augusta in the 1890s. An Aiken resident writes: Hamburg was also the site of a racial battle, in July 1876. Ben Tillman's accounts of these events makes chilling reading. ("The Struggles of 1876"). Another resident writes about the Hamburg Meriwether Monument: Here's more info on the location of the Hamburg monument. I'm not sure if there's a marker for the town itself or not. It might be in that book of SC markers. I think the best, and most up to date, account of the Hamburg Massacre (and it's interesting to trace the change of terminology in the historical literature) is Steve Kantrowitz's new book on Ben Tillman on UNC Press. I don%u2019t know what other sources he might have cited (Joel Williamson, After Slavery, and Richard Zuczek, State of Rebellion, come to mind, maybe also George Tindall, South Carolina Negroes, 1877 1900). Also re: the Meriwether monument of 1916: The Merriweather monument is still standing and is located in John C. Calhoun Park at the intersection of Georgia and Carolina Avenues in downtown North Augusta.
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